Now Trending: The Long & Short Of It

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Our latest look at S/S 2014 Trends puts an emphasis on the lower half. Read on for two key reasons why we might be packing away our skinny jeans and cut-offs – at least for now.

 

 

First, a refined trend in oversized pants has emerged, cousin to the harem, parachute, and palazzo. From exotic styles that originated in the Arabian Peninsula, to the Katherine Hepburn menswear movement in the 1940’s, these looks belong to a fashion family which has constantly evolved through time. Additional resurgences of note include the bell bottoms of the 1970’s disco scene, and glamorous harem-esque styles of the 1990’s. Never fear the cartoonish, oversized MC Hammer pant, however. Today’s fuller shape is soft, flowing, and elegant.

 

 

On to our second half, with what were called, at varying points in time, stubbies, knickerbockers, slackettes, walking shorts, and Bermudas. Borrowed from the boys, this ‘long short’ began its life in the late 1890’s as a school or military uniform. Ladies were generally not welcome to wear this daring, leg-baring clothing article for many decades. For golf or sporting activities, the shorts were then slowly introduced to women following World War II. We again spotted a preference for longer, slim-cut shorts through the very preppy late 1980’s and 1990’s. This season, shorts are again longer, leaner, and sophisticated.

Below, we present designer runway inspiration featuring both styles, plus buy-it-now finds to get the look:

 

On The Runway

 

 

 

Blumarine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel Zoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vera Wang

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Araks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Isabel Marant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shop The Trend

 

 

Silk Harem Pant, Anthropologie ($118)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pleated Shorts, Zara ($40)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Railroad Stripe Bermuda Short, J. Crew ($65)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional research by Natalie Starnes. All runway and product images via individual designers and retailers.

 

 

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